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North American Countries Target “Super” Greenhouse Gases Through Strengthened Ozone Treaty

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The US, Canada, and Mexico have submitted a proposal to strengthen climate protection under the Montreal Protocol— the international treaty that phases out the production of a number of substances responsible for ozone depletion. The Federated States of Micronesia submitted a similar proposal on HFCs as well. HFC emissions controlled under the Kyoto Protocol would not be affected by either the North American or Micronesia proposal.

2010 161

New international Climate and Clean Air Coalition to focus on reduction of short-lived climate pollutants

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Global benefits from full implementation of measures for reduction of short-lived climate pollutants in 2030 compared to the reference scenario. US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants, a new global initiative to seize the opportunity of realizing concrete benefits on climate, health, food and energy resulting from reducing short-lived climate pollutants.

2012 185
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Indo-US task force to study HFC phase-down

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The global warming potentials (GWP) of HFCs range from 140 (HFC-152a) to 11,700 (HFC-23), according to the US EPA. HFCs are chemicals are potential substitutes for ozone-depleting and climate-warming CFCs and HCFCs currently being phased out under the Montreal Protocol treaty to protect the ozone layer. India and the US have agreed to establish an Indo-US Technical Task Force on hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs—super greenhouse gases.

2011 170

Cutting Non-CO2 Pollutants Can Delay Abrupt Climate Change; The Fast Action Climate Agenda

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A “fast-action” climate agenda including reducing non-CO 2 climate change agents such as black carbon soot, tropospheric ozone, and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), as well as expanding bio-sequestration through biochar production, can forestall fast-approaching abrupt climate changes, according to Nobel Laureate Dr. Mario Molina (Chemistry, 1995) and co-authors in a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Tropospheric ozone.