Global study shows uneven urbanization among large cities in the last two decades

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Kathmandu in Nepal, Dar es Salaam in Tanzania). The world has experienced significant urbanization in recent decades. According to the latest report from the United Nations (UN), the global population in 2018 was 7.6 billion and the urban population was 4.2 billion.

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Roskill: graphite prices could push higher on tightening markets for batteries & electrodes

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At the same time, consumption of graphite electrodes in electric arc furnaces (EAFs) began to rise as the Chinese government took steps to halt production of poor quality induction furnace steel. The focus for new natural graphite development remains in Africa, where almost 1 Mtpy of additional concentrate capacity has the potential to come online by 2027 with projects in Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, and Tanzania.

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Researchers castigate planning bodies for ill-conceived Jatropha programs

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million ha (49,421 square miles) are expected to be planted by 2015—are “ anything but encouraging ”, according to Promode Kant from the Institute of Green Economy in India and Shuirong Wu of the Chinese Academy of Forestry. The results of massive plantings of Jatropha worldwide for use as a biofuel feedstock—some 12.8

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Perspective: Why Carbon Emissions Should Not Have Been the Focus of the UN Climate Change Summit and Why the 15th Conference of the Parties Should Have Focused on Technology Transfer

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The Chinese can promise to do this because they’re modernizing their economy. For example, Chinese negotiators do not want to sign up to an agreement that involves inspectors visiting their country to verify progress on climate commitments; While an eventual treaty would be likely to include a cap-and-trade system, under which the world’s bigger polluters would buy allowances from cleaner corporations or utilities, it is unclear how—or even if—it would work. Perspective by Brian J.